NJ VHF NET (NJVN) October Statistics and Tips

Submitted by KA2PBT on Sun, 11/11/2018 - 16:41
From: Jim Kutsch KY2D NNJ STM, NJVN Net ManagerARRL NTS LOGO

NJVN MONTHLY REPORT OCTOBER 2018
SESSIONS 31 CHECK INS 304
TRAFFIC 50 (brought) / 50 (passed) IN 327 MINUTES
39 DIFFERENT STATIONS

NJVN is still in need of more net control stations. If you would like to give it a try, please let me know. I have an NCS instruction document I can send you. Volunteering to be an alternate NCS to fill in when a regular NCS is unavailable is a great way to start. Please consider it and let me know if you are interested.

We have several new members who may be just starting out in traffic handling. Accepting a message and delivering it is a great next step for newcomers. Please volunteer to take a message on the net. Practice by writing down a message that someone else is receiving. Or, if you want to receive a practice message, let me know and I’ll send one to you. When you are ready, the next step is to send a message. It can be to anyone else on the net, to me as Net Manager, or to a friend or relative.

To help those less familiar with the proper radiogram format, below is a radiogram with explanations of all the parts. If you have any questions, please ask on a net or, you could send me your question in a radiogram of your own. If you haven’t passed a message yet, please join in. It’s very rewarding when serious messages come through and your ham radio interest makes a meaningful difference for someone.

Remember, as W8YS, the Net Manager of the Eastern Area Net always says “Ham radio is a hobby; traffic handling is a commitment.” Is it time for you to notch up your commitment by receiving or sending a radiogram? By becoming an alternate NCS? Jump in. NJVN is a “training net” and we take that seriously. All questions are welcome and we all started on a training net somewhere.

Sample Radiogram

The phrases in square brackets are explanations. Radiograms are always written in upper case with no punctuation.

[the preamble]

NR 351 R HXC K3RXK 20 WALKER MD FEB 21

[In the above, 351 is the message number as set by the sending station;

R is the precedence for the message, in this case "routine" (as opposed to emergency or priority);

HXC is the "handling instructions" which is optional. handling instruction "C" requests that the delivering station report back to the originating station the date and time the message was delivered;

K3RXK is the station that originated the message;

20 is the "check", the number of letter groups in the message body between the two "BT" prosigns;

WALKER MD is the place of origin; and

FEB 21 is the date the message was originated. Optionally a time of origination can be included before the date]

[the addressee (full address and phone number are preferred when possible)]

AL BAROLET KJ3E
108 ELLIOTT CT
CALIFORNIA MD 20619
301 862 3201
BT

[this pro sign, read as "break" indicates the end of the preamble and the beginning of the actual message body]

[message text is usually written in lines of five or ten words to make the "check" easier to confirm]

CAN YOU ATTEND THE JUNE
MEETING OF THE FREDERICK AMATEUR
RADIO CLUB QUERY YOUR TRAFFIC
HANDLING EXPERIENCES ARE INTERESTING 73

[Note the question mark was spelled out and the "X" (read as X-RAY) is used for a period]

BT

[This "break" indicates end of message body]

[signature]

TONY K3RXK